Archive for category Marine

About Seismic Interpretation

Posted by on Sunday, 9 December, 2012

Robin Westerman : “Absolute BME: Quantitative Seismic Interpretation”

Roxar Software: “RMS 2012 – Seismic Inversion and Attributes”



2D High Resolution Seismic on Norfolk Prospect

Posted by on Wednesday, 21 November, 2012

North Sea Energy Inc. announces that a 2D hi-resolution seismic program on the Norfolk Prospect (block 12/16b) (20% NSE interest) has been completed after receiving approval from DECC (UK Department of Energy and Climate Change).

The weather during November has been favourable and allowed us to acquire more data than the base plan. This will allow us to test 3D migrating the data and/or creating a Geocube product.

The processing of the additional seismic will enhance our understanding of the prospect in terms of the ‘up dip’ extent of the Norfolk prospect and assist in the determination of the drilling target. The acquiring of the seismic data this year allows us to progress our evaluation of the prospect and to make a drilling decision sooner and without delay to the project.

About Norfolk Prospect and Norfolk East Prospect – 12/16b and 12/17b

The blocks are located in the Inner Moray Firth, a short distance from the Sutherland coast. The Norfolk prospect is a large stratigraphic pinchout and dip closure of the lower cretaceous Coracle sands with additional leads in the Punt and Beatrice sands. The best estimate undiscovered oil initially-in-place of 209.0 MMstb at Norfolk and 55.5 MMstb at Norfolk East as estimated for NSE in Sproule’s Report dated July 31, 2011.


Wireless Seismic Technology in Alaska’s Cook Inlet

Posted by on Thursday, 4 October, 2012

Houston-based Apache Corp. has become the first producer to use true-cable free wireless seismic technology offshore Alaska to limit the impact of seismic activity on Cook Inlet’s wildlife, communities and environment – including Cook Inlet beluga whales.

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The use of wireless 3-D seismic is part of Apache’s commitment to conducting 3-D seismic operations in Alaska’s Cook Inlet “in ways that limit the impact on communities and the environment,” the company said in a July 24 article on its website, addressing criticisms of its seismic program.

Apache is using true cable-free nodal recording systems, designed and manufactured by Sugar Land, Texas-based FairfieldNodal, in order to minimize the impact of its seismic survey on Cook Inlet’s wildlife population and environment.

“Because we’re shooting onshore and offshore, we have to go back and meld and blend the data for the different sections together,” said Lisa Parker.

The company is using the technology for its ongoing 3D seismic survey of Cook Inlet, which will encompass onshore, offshore and the transition zone of Apache’s acreage. The seismic survey will continue for the next two and a half years.

After acquiring leases on 850,000 acres in Cook Inlet in August 2010, Apache began the permitting process for its seismic and exploration programs. In an effort to address concerns over the impact of seismic activity on local wildlife and the environment, Apache conducted a technology test to compare how traditional cable seismic would perform versus a wireless system.

Impressed with what it saw, the company initiated the permitting process to utilize wireless seismic and received approval to use this technology in the spring of 2011.
Apache began its Cook Inlet seismic program in November 2011, and has been working continuously since then, save for a six-week break from Christmas through the first part of February.

Approximately 1.4 billion barrels of oil was discovered in Cook Inlet in its early development in the 1950s and 1960s. Exploration and production in Cook Inlet declined after the discovery of Prudhoe Bay. Only a handful of fields have been discovered in Cook Inlet, but the field size distribution strongly suggests another 1.3 to 1.4 billion barrels of oil remain to be discovered in the Cook Inlet basin, Apache said.

Apache will begin drilling in Cook Inlet in October.

Fairfield’s product is truly cable free, unlike nodes from manufacturers who have elected to keep the power supply, electronics and sensor connected with short cables and connectors, said Roger Keyte head of marketing and business development at FairfieldNodal.

The nodes are placed on the ocean floor or buried onshore. Except for a rope tied to nodes placed offshore to retrieve them – the rope is not involved in the spacing of the node – the nodes have no cables, said Keyte.

Marine nodes weigh 65 pounds and look like a 50-pound free weight, but are a bit thicker, said Lisa Parker, head of government relations for Apache in Alaska. Land nodes weigh 4.8 pounds and look like a two-pound coffee can with a spike on the bottom. Both types of nodes are made of plastic and stainless steel.

The nodes are retrieved after a period time and taken back to the office, where the data is downloaded and the nodes are recharged. The data is then forwarded to Apache’s geoscientists for interpretation.

“Because we’re shooting onshore and offshore, we have to go back and meld and blend the data for the different sections together,” said Lisa Parker, head of government relations for Apache in Alaska. “It’s like putting the pieces of a puzzle back together.”

Since 1924, traditional seismic systems have involved sensors connected to cables. These sensors transmitted signals back to a localized recording system to be converted into digits, said Keyte.

Using a system with heavy, cumbersome cables presents difficulties onshore and offshore, Keyte noted. Offshore, the cables mean seismic vessels can’t get close to structures in the water such as rigs and platforms. Traditional systems also tend to be noisier.

Using cabled system onshore was especially problematic, with electrical leakages occurring due to animals biting or chewing the cables or sweat from the hands of workers, said Keyte.

Utilizing a true cable-free system cuts down on the amount of time crews spend troubleshooting to fix leakages. The cable free system increases the reliability of data and allows the recording time to be controlled.

More details


2D Survey in Northeast Greenland

Posted by on Tuesday, 6 September, 2011

TGS has commenced a new 1,000 km multi-client 2D survey in Northeast Greenland in partnership with Fugro.

This survey will enable customers to prepare for the announced Greenland Licensing Round in 2012/2013 and will significantly add to a data set that TGS has been growing since 2008 in this promising region. After this year’s data acquisition, TGS will be able to offer approximately 4,500 km of new multi-client 2D data, a large volume of reprocessed multi-client 2D data and full coverage of aeromagnetic/gravity data over the basins that are to be included in the planned licensing round.

The new seismic data is being acquired by the M/V Akademik Shatskiy supported by the ice breaker M/V Fennicia and is scheduled to complete during Q4 2011. Data processing will be performed by TGS and data will be available to clients during Q1 2012.


R&D in seismic technique

Posted by on Monday, 6 June, 2011

Shell Chief Scientist for Geophysics, Dirk Smit, discusses how innovative technologies — sometimes developed in unusual R&D partnerships — help energy companies to explore for harder-to-find oil and gas resources.


3D seismic survey in the Tarakan Basin

Posted by on Thursday, 23 December, 2010

TGS will commence a new multi-client 3D survey in the Tarakan Basin, offshore East Kalimantan, Indonesia in the Celebes Sea.  The survey, TBN10, is the first ever multi-client 3D survey for TGS in Indonesia waters and will cover in excess of 1,600 km2.  The data will be acquired by the M/V Seisquest and will commence before the end of this year, with acquisition expected to complete in Q1 2011.

The TBN10 survey will be conducted over the highly prospective and extensive play fairway which includes a recent gas discovery. The new 3D seismic will provide improved stratigraphic and structural resolution of the Tarakan sub-basin, leading to a better understanding of its petroleum system and a much clearer definition of the numerous leads and prospects already identified on existing 2D seismic in the area.

“TGS is particularly excited to announce this new 3D program, stated CEO Robert Hobbs.  The company has built significant experience in this region through our long-term investment in data that informs our customers about the potential of this frontier region.  This 3D project confirms the further maturation of this important hydrocarbon province.”

The TBN10 multi-client 3D survey is supported by industry funding and also supports the Indonesia government’s overall objective to attract exploration and raise declining production levels.


Sentinel Nautilus – visually about marine seismic

Posted by on Wednesday, 8 December, 2010


Exploring the St. Lawrence Seabed

Posted by on Sunday, 3 October, 2010

Developing new methodologies for the resource evaluation of marine gas hydrates Prof. Edwards’ marine geophysics group (University of Toronto) has just completed a research cruise aboard the Coriolis II, during which they field-tested a controlled-source electromagnetic array. Their research method can help people make intelligent decisions about exploitation versus environmental concerns for oil and gas in the St. Lawrence.

The Research Vessel RV Coriolis II has been in operation since 2002 and has participated in a significant number of scientific and training missions as well as commercial charters. Crucial research programs have occured since its debut, emphasizing the importance of the vessel for the scientific community in Canada and most importantly for the St-Lawrence ocean science sector.


EMGS launches 3D EM project

Posted by on Sunday, 19 September, 2010

EMGS announces that it has received industry funding for a joint project to accelerate the use of 3D EM data in exploration and production. The EDDA project involves acquiring state-of-the-art 3D EM data over known fields on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

Data acquisition over the Linerle and Valkyrie fields has already started using EMGS’s mobile acquisition set deployed on the vessel Siem Mollie. The vessel will subsequently acquire data over the Snøhvit field, and it is expected that this survey will be completed by the end of September.

EMGS chief executive officer, commented: EMGS has, over the last three years, developed new-generation 3D EM technology. This has triggered customer demand for high-quality, open 3D EM datasets that can be used to calibrate and integrate other geophysical data from well-documented fields.


Protest against seismic study on Paracel Islands

Posted by on Saturday, 7 August, 2010

Hanoi – The Vietnamese government on Thursday protested seismic study activities by China and the country’s expansion work in the Tri Ton Island area of the Paracels Archipelago.

“China’s actions have violated Vietnam’s sovereignty over the Paracels Archipelago, Vietnam’s sovereign rights to the continental shelf, the 200-nautical-mile Exclusive Economic Zone, going against the spirit of the Declaration of the Code of Conduct in the South China Sea (…),” said government spokeswoman Nguyen Phuong Nga.

Nga said since late May, China had been sending the M/V Western Spirit seismic survey vessel, together with escort ships, to conduct seismic studies in the Tri Ton Island area and in oil and gas exploration lots 141, 142 and 143 on Vietnam’s continental shelf, approximately 90 – 116 nautical miles (167 – 214 kilometres) from Ly Son Island of Quang Ngai province.

China has also been carrying out ground leveling on Tri Ton Island for construction works on this island, Nga said.

Vietnam’s foreign ministy raised the matter several times withEeijing, but “China is continuing those activities,” Nga said.

China has occupied the Paracels since 1974 when its troops overwhelmed a South Vietnamese garrison occupying the islands. China has seized hundreds of Vietnamese fishermen fishing near the Paracels for the past years for “infringing China’s territory.”

Both Vietnam and China are signatories to the 2002 Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea. It commits the parties to resolving the islands’ status through negotiations and provides for freedom of navigation.

The US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in July called on the Association of South-East Asian Nations and China to reach agreement on a full code of conduct in the South China Sea to prevent conflicts.

She also pushed for proper settlement of the South China Sea issue through multilateral negotiations, but China rebuffed as saying it favoured a bilateral negotiations.

The South China Sea is believed to contain substantial undersea oil reserves.

Copyright DPA


QUASAR is a winner

Posted by on Saturday, 31 July, 2010
Quasar Geophysical Technologies (QuasarGeo) is pleased to announce that its newly optimized QMax EM3 (QMax) receiver has been chosen by the editors of R&D Magazine as one of the winners of the 48th Annual R&D 100 Awards, which salute the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year. QuasarGeo developed the technology using extensive experience in electromagnetic sensing and with technical advice and testing support from Dr. Steven Constable of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.
The QMax is a next-generation ocean-bottom electromagnetic (EM) receiver designed for surveying underwater oil and gas deposits with improved operational efficiency, safety, and data quality. The use of such receivers in oil exploration can increase the “strike rate” of oil deposits found per exploratory well drilled, thus decreasing the number of such wells that must be drilled and lowering associated drilling costs, a savings which might eventually show up in lower gas prices at the pumps. In addition to cost savings, fewer wells drilled means less environmental risk and impact. Furthermore, EM surveys have shown the potential to identify the presence of methane hydrates, compounds often present in deepwater drilling areas that can both pose a hazard to oil drilling and may have a future as an energy source in their own right. Quasar Geophysical Technologies (QuasarGeo) is pleased toannounce that its newly optimized QMax EM3 (QMax) receiver has been chosen by the editorsof R&D Magazine as one of the winners of the 48th Annual R&D 100 Awards, which salute the100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the pastyear. QuasarGeo developed the technology using extensive experience in electromagnetic sensing and with technical advice and testing support from Dr. Steven Constable of ScrippsInstitution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.The QMax is a next-generation ocean-bottom electromagnetic (EM) receiver designed forsurveying underwater oil and gas deposits with improved operational efficiency, safety, and dataquality. The use of such receivers in oil exploration can increase the “strike rate” of oil depositsfound per exploratory well drilled, thus decreasing the number of such wells that must be drilledand lowering associated drilling costs, a savings which might eventually show up in lower gasprices at the pumps. In addition to cost savings, fewer wells drilled means less environmentalrisk and impact. Furthermore, EM surveys have shown the potential to identify the presence ofmethane hydrates, compounds often present in deepwater drilling areas that can both pose ahazard to oil drilling and may have a future as an energy source in their own right.

Norwegian Continental Shelf is under the survey

Posted by on Monday, 14 June, 2010

TGS announced another season of acquisition of long offset data on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) in cooperation with Fugro.  The data to be collected (shown on the attached map) include approximately 15,000 km for the North Sea Renaissance (NSR) survey in Holland, Norway and UK, approximately 10,000 km for the Mid-Norway Regional (MNR) survey in the Norwegian Sea and approximately 15,000 km for the Norwegian Barents Sea Regional (NBR) survey in the Barents Sea.

TGS will dedicate two vessels, Bergen Surveyor and Northern Genesis, during the summer season to acquire the NSR project.  The data acquired by these vessels will be processed at TGS’ imaging center in Bedford, England.  Fugro will also contribute two vessels, Geo Arctic and Akademik Lazarev, to acquire the MNR and NBR data, respectively.  Fugro will process the data acquired on those two projects.

With the 2010 acquisition program, TGS’ total long offset grid on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) increases to approximately 260,000 km, constituting the most important 2D seismic dataset for the oil industry in the NCS. Data from the three surveys will be available for customers from Q4-2010.


3D Geomertrics seismic system in Italy

Posted by on Sunday, 28 March, 2010

Codevintec was on the receiving end of numerous hours of training regarding 3D technology and Marine Seismology including the GeoEel (digital towed hydrophone streamers) and MicroEel (analog seismic solid streamer). Bart Hoekstra, 3D Product Manager conducted the training.


Source: http://www.geometrics.com/blog/2010/03/italy-embraces-3d-and-marine-seismic-technology


Offshore oil and gas exploration with advanced Fugro’s vessels

Posted by on Sunday, 28 March, 2010

On 12 March 2010, Fugro formally took delivery of a new-build survey vessel, the M/V Fugro Searcher which it commissioned in 2007. Fugro took the opportunity to look at all aspects of overall survey vessel design in detail and install the latest equipment, making it the most advanced vessel of its type in the world.

The vessel will operate in the offshore oil and gas industry and the offshore renewable energy sector. It will be able to carry out the full range of site and route survey tasks to obtain the high resolution data necessary for safe, efficient and cost-effective planning, design and engineering activities involving the seabed and the installation of pipelines, platforms, wind turbines, subsea structures and other seabed furniture.

The new vessel will have permanently mobilised geophysical and hydrographic survey spreads. Geotechnical equipment will be installed on a project by project basis. The Fugro Searcher represents initial steps in a global vessel replacement schedule with the objective of removing older tonnage from the fleet and clearly differentiating Fugro’s Offshore Survey Division from other providers.

On 19 March 2010, Fugro formally took delivery of a new-build seismic survey vessel, the M/V Geo Caspian, which is on long term charter from ship-owner Volstad Maritime AS.

The vessel was outfitted at Fosen Yards in Norway and is one of the largest and most advanced seismic vessels ever built. Caspian is the third C-class vessel in a series of four delivered to Fugro since 2007.

Geo Caspian is designed to work worldwide in the most challenging offshore areas, and is capable of towing 16 seismic streamers. The C-class vessel design allow deployment of the largest possible spread of seismic streamers which are considered essential for efficiency when performing geophysical exploration on large prospects in the ”high end” market segment.

The next C-class vessel, the M/V Geo Coral will be delivered to Fugro in August 2010.

Source: http://www.fugro.com/news/news.asp?q=2010